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Tuesday, November 24, 2020 | History

6 edition of Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance found in the catalog.

Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance

Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance

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  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Cambridgeshire], New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Occultism and science -- History,
  • Science, Renaissance

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Brian Vickers.
    ContributionsVickers, Brian.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBF1429 .O26 1984
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 408 p. :
    Number of Pages408
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3172867M
    ISBN 100521258790
    LC Control Number83015116


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Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance Download PDF EPUB FB2

In fact, two separate mentalities can be traced, the occult and the scientific, each having different assumptions, goals, and methodologies.

The contributors call into question many of the received ideas on this topic, showing that the issue has been wrongly defined and based on inadequate historical : Brian Vickers.

Buy Occult & Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance Revised ed. by Vickers, Brian (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Brian Vickers. Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance | Brian Vickers | download | B–OK.

Download books for free. Find books. The essays in this volume present a collective study of one of the major problems in the recent history of science: To what extent did the occult 'sciences' (alchemy, astrology, numerology, and natural magic) contribute to the scientific revolution of the late Renaissance.

These studies of major scientists (Kepler, Bacon, Mersenne, and Newton) and of occultists (Dee, Fludd, and. Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance, Paperback by Vickers, Brian (EDT), ISBNISBNLike New Used, Free shipping in the US The essays in this volume present a collective study of one of the major problems in the recent history of science: To what extent did the occult 'sciences' (alchemy, astrology /5(4).

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xiv, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm: Contents: At the crossroads of magic and science: John Dee's archemastrie / Nicholas H. Clulee --The occult tradition in the English universities of the Renaissance: a reassessment / Mordechai Feingold --Analogy versus identity: the rejection of occult.

In fact, two separate mentalities can be traced, the occult and the scientific, each having different assumptions, goals, and methodologies. The contributors call into question many of the received ideas on this topic, showing that the issue has been wrongly defined and based on inadequate historical : Brian Vickers.

Occult Scientific Mentalities - by Brian Vickers June John Dee has often figured significantly in discussions of the interconnections of occultism and science in the Renaissance. Book-Review - Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance Vickers, B.; Park, K. Abstract. Publication: Journal for the History of Astronomy.

Pub Date: August DOI: / Bibcode: JHAV full text sources. ADS |. "BRIAN VICKERS (ed.), Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance, Cambridge, Cambridge University Presspp." published on 01 Jan by Brill. The occult tradition in the English universities of the Renaissance: a reassessment Mordechai Feingold; 3.

Analogy versus identity: the rejection of occult symbolism, Brian Vickers; 4. Marin Mersenne: Renaissance naturalism and Renaissance magic William L. Hine; 5. Ambiguities in the Scientific Revolution. (Book Reviews: Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance) Dobbs, B.

general differences between occult and scientific mentalities. Robert Westman observes in his chapterthat Fluddhada any search for "occult and scientific mentalities" in the Renaissance andear-ly modern period.

As Richard Westfall This book incorporates 44 of-the pa-relatively safe task ofdescription. Book review Full text access Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance: ed. Vickers (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ), xiv + pp., £ Peter Burke.

Title: Book-Review - Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance Authors: Vickers, B. & Park, K. Journal: Journal for the History of Astronomy, Vol, NO. 50/AUG, P, Bibliographic Code: JHAV. Complete bibliographic record Other article options Print this article. Historians and literary scholars will find in this book a thought provoking guide to inter-preting the intentions behind many of the literary works of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Ronald H. Fritze Lamar University Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance, by. Brian Vickers: Francis Bacon and Renaissance Prose [antikvár] 0% kedvezménnyel csak Ft a -nál. (Irodalomtud., -történet, -elm.; kiadás éve:. Occult & Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance Edited by Brian Vickers.

pages. 6 x 9 inches. Publishing Info: Cambridge University Press. New York. Overall in VERY GOOD condition, with VERY GOOD DJ. A collection of essays depicting the origins and ideologies of scientific and occultist mentality by major scientists and prominent.

READING THE BOOK OF NATURE IN RENAISSANCE SCIENCE Massimo Luigi Bianchi, Signatura rerum. Segni, magia a conoscenza da Paracelso a Lei6niz (Rome: Edizioni dell'Ateneo, ), pp,+ 4 ill, paper. THE LAST FEW decades' have seen an explosion of literature on the occult sciences in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

"Artes quaerendi" (essay review of B. Vickers, ed., "Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance"). Even so, I have to say that I find his distinction between two ‘mentalities’, occult and scientific, in the pre-modern period, is a clear case of putting the positivist cart before the historical horse.

See his Introduction to Vickers (ed.), Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance (ref. 14), 1 – Google Scholar. Legacy. A Renaissance tradition held that Artephius had been born in the first or second century and died in the twelfth, thanks to having discovered the alchemical elixir that made it possible to prolong life.

In his Secret Book, Artephius indeed claims to be more than a thousand years old. In printed form, works attributed to Artephius became well known in the seventeenth century. Essay Review: Revisions of Science and Magic: From Paracelsus to Newton: Magic and the Making of Modern Science, Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance Patrick Curry History of Science 3, Vickers, Brian, ed.

Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, Articles on John Dee, Marin Mersenne, Johannes Kepler, Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton, universities, and witchcraft and demonology, most of which question the extent to which.

More generally, Hakansson offers some effective critiques of the tendency still prevalent among scholars today to distinguis h too sharply between "occult" and "scientific" mentalities in the Renaissance, and he reminds us of the significant continuities in this period between Christian theology and liturgy and the discourses of magic and the.

In: Vickers B, ed: Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance Publisher: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Description: p. Language: Undetermined Language MeSH: History, Early Modern ; History, Modern ; Witchcraft/history* Publication Type(s): Historical Article Other ID: (DNLM) NLM ID.

Hine, William L. "Marin Mersenne: Renaissance naturalism and Renaissance magic." In Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance, edited by. istically imposed split between occult and non-occult thought in the Renaissance.

Vickers' attempts to characterize two opposed mentalities, one 'occult', the other 'scientific', made both in the introduction and in his own essay, centre on the differing uses of analogy and metaphor in what he calls the two 'systems', as well as on more structural.

usual suspects among the occult sciences but adds “occult” medicines and remedies which, because of their power to prolong human life, must be kept from the masses (Bridgesvol. 2, pp.

–10).7 “Secret knowl-edge” is the primary sense of Renaissance occulta philosophia as. - Scientific American "A remarkable summary and analysis of the five systems of esoteric science so influential in the Renaissance." - Milton Quarterly "A magnificent job of tying together a vast number of diverse sources into a unified whole engrossing in its entirety.".

The revival of the occult sciences — astrology, alchemy, numerology and natural magic — during the Renaissance used to be an embarrassment to historians. Some preferred to address themselves to the Scientific Revolution and simply ignore the occult leanings of Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, Giordano Bruno, John Dee, Robert Fludd, and others.

In fact, two separate mentalities can be traced, the occult and the scientific, each having different assumptions, goals, and methodologies. The contributors call into question many of the received ideas on this topic, showing that the issue has been wrongly defined and based on inadequate historical evidence.

From Magic to Science. New York: Dover Publications, []. Thomas, Keith V. Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century England.

London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, Vickers, Brian, ed. Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1. Author(s): Vickers,Brian Title(s): Occult and scientific mentalities in the Renaissance/ edited by Brian Vickers.

Country of Publication: England Publisher: Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press,   In an influential essay entitled “Analogy versus Identity,” included in a book he edited with the title Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance, Brian Vickers has argued that what distinguishes the Renaissance occult tradition from the emergent scientific tradition was their respective attitudes toward the relation between.

Thankfully, the role of the occult and esoteric knowledge in Europe has long fascinated scholars, even if Rosicrucianism is not the most popular topic, and so substantial research on the topic has been collected into the book Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance.Brian Vickers, Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page Aarsleff's first published essay on this topic, "Leibniz on Locke on Language" remains important, despite.

Copenhaver, B. () "Renaissance Magic and Neoplatonic Philosophy: Ennead in Ficino's De vit coelitus comparanda", in G. Garfagnini (ed.) Marcilio Ficino e il ritorno di Platone, Florence, pp.

Farmer, S. () Syncretism in the West: Pico's Theses (), MRTS, pp. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Cambridge Studies in the History of Science Ser.: Man and Nature in the Renaissance by Allen George Debus (, Trade Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay.

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